Arizona Emissions Tests Frequently Asked Questions

Arizona Emissions Tests Frequently Asked Questions

Emissions tests are mandatory in some parts of Arizona and people often have questions about them. Here are a selection of the most frequently asked questions from the official mycaraz.com website. 


If you’re searching for how to pass an emissions test in Scottsdale, Bridwell Automotive Center can help!

Our team understands the state and city’s requirements for emissions and how to help ensure your car, truck, or suv will pass emissions testing.ASE Certified automotive repair technicians can help you prepare for testing or can help repair issues if you have failed and emissions test.

Read more about reasons vehicles fail emissions tests and how much emissions repairs cost.


View Our Special Offers

General Emissions Testing Information

Q: Why is the Emissions Program important?

A: The program is a key component of Arizona’s initiative to protect air quality while allowing for economic growth. With the pollution reductions achieved, there is more room for new businesses to bring jobs to the area and for existing businesses to expand. Without the emissions program, federal laws would seriously restrict economic growth.

Q: Why does my vehicle need to be tested?

A: Automobiles are a major contributor to ground level air pollution. In Phoenix, the program is an important component of reducing volatile organic compounds and maintaining air quality. High pollution levels affect the future health of our children and make it more difficult to draw new business and create jobs in our communities. In Tucson, the program is key to maintaining a healthy and attractive environment for Southern Arizona. The Emissions Program will help provide a healthy future and a strong economy for Arizona and for our families.

Q: Who is required to have their vehicle emissions tested?

A: All residents of the greater Phoenix and Tucson areas and those who regularly commute into the areas for work or school are required to have their 1967 or newer vehicles pass an emissions test. Most vehicles newer than 6 years old are exempt from testing, and certain other vehicle exemptions apply (see Exemptions). If you are not sure if you live in the emissions control area, CLICK HERE.

Q: How will I be notified if my vehicle needs a test?

A: Motor Vehicle (MVD) will send a renewal notice stating if your vehicle requires emissions, or you may call (602)771-3950.

Q: Do I need an appointment before taking my vehicle to a test station?

A: No, vehicles are tested on a first-come, first-serve basis. No appointments are necessary. For your convenience, inspection stations are open until 7 PM weekdays and 8 AM to 5 PM on Saturdays.

You may save some time by visiting the inspection stations in the evening (from 5 PM – 7 PM on weekdays), on Saturday afternoon and avoiding the end of the month.

Q: How far in advance can I have my vehicle tested?

A: Vehicles cannot be tested more than 90 days prior to your registration date for registration purposes. If you are purchasing a car from someone or just want to know how well it is performing, you may test any time. If purchased from a dealer, the dealer is required to have the vehicle pass emissions prior to sale. Please note: Once tested, the test fee cannot be refunded.

Q: Who can take my vehicle in for a test?

A: Any licensed motorist may take a vehicle to the testing station.


Testing Specifics & Payment

Q: What vehicles must be tested?

A: Vehicles that are model year 1967 and newer and more than 5 years old require emissions—this includes gasoline and diesel-fueled vehicles. Alternative fuel, flexible fuel (E85) and hybrid vehicles also require emissions. Newer vehicles are exempt for the first 5 years of registration. Some vehicles may require a different schedule. If unsure, call 1-877-myAZcar (1-877-692-9227.)

Q: How often will my vehicle need to be tested?

A: Depending on the vehicle’s year and weight, emissions test frequency can vary from 1 to 2 years. Vehicles 1981 and newer that are light duty vehicles (not diesel) will require emissions every 2 years. Vehicles that are 1980 and older, and most vehicles in Tucson, require emissions every year. Check the registration renewal notice to see if your vehicle is due.

Q: What paperwork do I have to take with me to emissions inspection?

A: If you have been registered in Arizona for some time, you will not need to bring anything with you—we will have your vehicle information in the computer database. If you are new to Arizona, we will need to see the current title or registration of the vehicle and your residence address. Of course, you will also need the test fee in cash, check or credit/debit card.

Q: Are there any restrictions on where I can have my vehicle tested?

A: Vehicles that are registered in Maricopa County cannot be emission tested in the Tucson area, due to the different test requirements. Therefore, you must test in your respective area, but you may use any inspection station in that area. However, if the vehicle is tested using the OBD test, it may be tested in either area.

Q: Do I have to pay if my vehicle fails the test?

A: A vehicle test fee is charged for the first test. A FREE retest is done if the failing vehicle is tested within 60 days of the initial test.

Q: What will my vehicle be tested for (tailpipe test only)?

A: The tailpipe test measures your vehicle’s emissions under various operating conditions. It is designed to measure levels of hydrocarbon (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx). Vehicles will be required to meet emissions standards established for the year the vehicle was manufactured.

Q: What type of testing is required for diesel vehicles?

A: Diesel vehicles are tested for “smoke opacity”, in other words, how much visible pollutants are in the exhaust plume.

Q: What is tampering?

A: “Tampering” means removing, defeating, or altering an emissions control device that was installed on a vehicle at the time the vehicle was manufactured. Defeating includes failure to repair any malfunctioning emission control system or device.

Q: My vehicle did not pass; will the test station make necessary repairs?

A: No, the inspection stations do not make repairs. You may take your vehicle to a service facility of your choice to have the necessary repairs made.

Q: Where can I find the testing history of a vehicle?

A: To look up a vehicle’s test history, CLICK HERE.

 

Q: My car is a hybrid, but my registration renewal states “Emissions Required”. Do I need to have it tested?

A: Yes. A hybrid vehicle is not designated as an exempt vehicle like a total electric vehicle. It must be tested.

 

Q: Do I have to have my motorcycle emissions tested?

A: No. As of June 21, 2013, motorcycles are no longer required to be emissions tested in the State of Arizona.

 

Q: What is a “drive cycle” and how do I do it?

A: Most newer vehicles are equipped with computers and engine emissions monitors. The manufacturer establishes a drive cycle in order to properly reset monitors to a ready state, enabling testing. The drive cycle may be fairly simple or very complex, depending on the vehicle. It is often necessary to rely on trained professionals to properly complete the drive cycle. Check with your repair facility.

 


Out of Area Exemption

Q: What does “out of the area” mean for emissions testing?

A: Arizona has a clearly defined emissions control boundary for both Phoenix and Tucson. You are considered out of the area when your place of residence is located outside the indicated boundary line.

Q: How do I determine if I am “out of the area”?

A: Check your physical address using our address locator at http://gisweb.azdeq.gov/arcgis/veiareas/. You will see some areas are shaded pink. The pink area is the emissions control area. Your address will be marked by an “X” and there will be a disclaimer on the left hand side of the screen. The disclaimer will say either “is in VEI area A or B” or “is NOT in VEI area A or B”.

Q: If the locator map indicates that I am “out of the area”, do I qualify for the “out of area” exemption?

A: You must meet the following criteria to qualify for an “out of area” exemption.

  • You reside in a partial zip code. These are zip codes that are right along the boundary line with part of it inside and part outside the area.
  • The address locator shows that you are outside the area.
  • You do not use the vehicle to commute into an emissions control area on a regular basis (for work or school).

Q: How do I apply for the “out of area” exemption?

A: Complete the “out of area” exemption form located at http://myazcar.com/pdf/Out-of-Area-Exemption-Application-and-Instructions.pdf and submit for processing. Remember to include the documents requested in the form”s instructions. Once the application is approved and processed you will be notified by either email or regular mail, whichever is quickest and easiest. After notification that the application has been approved you will able to finish registration renewal with Motor Vehicle.


Out of State Exemptions

Q: My vehicle is located in Arizona but I am out of state, do I qualify for an out of state exemption?

A: No, an out of state exemption is for a vehicle located in another state at the time the vehicle’s registration is due in Arizona.

Q: Can someone else take my vehicle to the emissions test station for testing?

A: Yes. The vehicle can be brought for testing by whomever the vehicle owner designates to do so.

Q: How do I apply for an out of state exemption?

A: You can apply online 24/7 by visiting myazcar.com/exemptions and clicking “Apply and Pay Online.” The $9.50 application fee can be paid by Visa, Master Card, American Express or electronic check. Once your application is approved, a notification will be emailed to you. You can then renew your vehicle registration with the Motor Vehicle Division in person, by mail, online at www.servicearizona.com or over the phone by calling 1-888-713-3031.

Q: Will you accept an emissions test from another state?

A: Yes, we will accept a passing emissions test.

Q: I tested my vehicle in another state, but failed the Safety Check, is that ok?

A: Arizona does not require a Safety Check. If you have a passing emissions test and a failed Safety Check, you may still submit an out of state emissions exemption request.

Q: Can I fax or email my out of state exemption to ADEQ?

A: No, ADEQ only accepts out of state exemption applications through the online portal | Learn More >

Q: I am from another state can I test here in Arizona?

A: Yes, our stations will test any out of state vehicle.

Q: I sent in my emissions test but got it back with a letter with “compliance” check marked, what do I do?

A: If you see “ADOT” at the top left then the paperwork was sent to the incorrect agency. The Emissions Exemption paperwork must be sent to ADEQ’s main administrative office in Phoenix (1110 W. Washington St. Phoenix, AZ 85007) or Tucson (400 W. Congress St., Suite 433 Tucson, AZ 85701) prior to registering vehicle with Motor Vehicle Division.

Q: How do I find out if my out of state exemption has been accepted?

A: Click on the vehicle emissions history link below, enter your vehicle identification number (VIN) and press the “submit” button to review the current emissions status of your vehicle.
Vehicle Emissions History >

Q: I had my car tested; do I have to have the out of state exemption/verification form completed?

A: If you see “ADOT” at the top left then the paperwork was sent to the incorrect agency. Emissions testing paperwork must be sent to ADEQ’s main administrative office in Phoenix (1110 W. Washington St. Phoenix, AZ 85007) or Tucson (400 W. Congress St., Suite 433 Tucson, AZ 85701) prior to registering the vehicle with Motor Vehicle Division.

Q: After my exemption is processed how can I renew my registration?

A: After we process your exemption you can renew your registration online at: www.servicearizona.com, call (602) 255-0072/(520) 629-9808, or via mail to: Motor Vehicle Division, P.O. Box 2100, Phoenix, AZ 85031.

Q: How long does the online out of state exemption take to process?

A: Once your online application is received it may take one to two business days to process.

Q: Can I send my registration renewal money with my out of state exemption fee?

A: No, the emissions exemption process is completed by ADEQ and your vehicle registration is completed by AZDOT. Additionally, ADEQ only accepts online payment for the out of state emissions exemption fee.

Scottsdale Emissions Repair Service

If you want to ensure you will pass on the first try for emissions testing, or if you have already failed and need help repairing your vehicle so it will pass; Bridwell Automotive Center is here to help!  From your daily driver Fords and Chevy’s all the way up to your McLaren or Ferrari our ASE Master Technicians are ready and waiting to help your pass emissions test in Scottsdale, AZ.

Schedule emissions repair or give us a call at (480) 948-4781

How Much Does Oxygen Sensor Replacement Cost?

Oxygen Sensor Replacement Cost

Oxygen sensor replacement costs about $576, with average O2 sensor prices ranging from $561 to $590 in the US for 2020 according to RepairPal.com, and other sources.

AutoServiceCosts says oxygen sensor replacement costs about $296 with average prices ranging from $113 to $478 to have a professional mechanic replace your O2 sensors. Their guide states that you can save money by replacing your oxygen sensors yourself and only spend around $20 to $94.

Cost Estimates for Oxygen Sensor Replacement

Labor price estimates range between $76 to $97, while parts prices range between $485 to $493. Estimates don’t include taxes and fees.

What is an Oxygen Sensor?

Oxygen Sensor

An oxygen sensor, commonly called an O2 sensor, is an instrument mounted in the vehicles exhaust system that continually oversees the oxygen content in the gases that leave the engine.

Before and after a catalytic converter are where the oxygen sensors are located. A vehicle can have up to 2 to 5 oxygen sensors, and occasionally, even more, depending on the vehicle.

How Does it Work?

The data from the oxygen sensor is used by the computer in the engine to assist in determining how much fuel is required so the engine will run as efficiently as possible. The sensor transmits this data by generating voltage once the sensor is heated. As the oxygen levels in the exhaust rise and fall the voltage will also rise and fall.

What are the Signs Related to a Faulty Oxygen Sensor?

A faulty oxygen sensor is one of the more typical causes for a check engine light to come on. Signs can include misfiring or hesitation from the engine, decreased fuel mileage, idling roughly or possibly stalling. A vehicle that fails an emissions test could be caused by a faulty oxygen sensor.

Is it Safe to Drive With a Problematic Oxygen Sensor?

A vehicle that has a faulty oxygen sensor may be driven safely until replacing the sensor. However, the vehicle won’t run as efficiently until the sensor is replaced.

Oxygen sensors will fail if they’re polluted with coolant, oil, silicone or other substances. When fluid pollution has caused an oxygen sensor to fail, the leak has to be fixed or the new sensor could also be damaged.

How Often are Oxygen Sensors Required to be Replaced?

On vehicles made since 1996, their oxygen sensors can go up to 100,000 miles or more prior to needing it to be replaced. That mileage will decrease on vehicles that are older.

Oxygen Sensor Vehicle Estimates

Chevrolet Silverado 1500 – $427 to $462

Ford F-150 – $308 to $372

Toyota Camry – $425 to $654

Honda Accord – $224 to $438

Honda Civic – $162-$410

Nissan Altima – $130 to $329

Honda CRV – $324 to $1142

Toyota Corolla – $322 to $527

Chevrolet Sonic – $128 to $138

Can I Replace the Oxygen Sensor Myself?

There is a pretty considerable disparity in cost between a professional mechanic replacing the vehicle’s Oxygen Sensor and replacing it yourself. If you feel you’re comfortable replacing it, you should try to replace the oxygen sensor yourself, because it’s a pretty simple job, it can save you 100’s of dollars.

How Can I Save Money on an Oxygen Sensor?

Don’t make the error of purchasing a replacement oxygen sensor from a mechanic or auto parts retailer. Find out the precise manufacturer part number for your vehicle, and then do a search online to find a much better price.

One other way to save money is not waiting for the sensor to fail. Check its function on regularly and have it replaced it if fuel efficiency decreases. This will reduce your overall average fuel costs each year. More vital, disregarding a faulty or failing oxygen sensor will ultimately cause the catalytic convertor to be damaged which is very costly to get replaced.

OBD codes associated to Oxygen Sensor Replacement

P0030: HO2S Heater Control Circuit

P0036: HO2S Heater Control Circuit

P0042: HO2S Heater Control Circuit

Source:

  1. Oxygen Sensor Replacement Cost – RepairPal Estimate.” RepairPal.com, https://repairpal.com/estimator/oxygen-sensor-replacement-cost.
  2. “Home.” How Much Does an Oxygen Sensor Cost? Price of Replacing an o2 Sensor, https://www.buyautoparts.com/howto/how-much-does-an-oxygen-sensor-cost.htm.
  3. How Much Does An Oxygen Sensor Cost To Replace?” FIXD Automotive, 28 Mar. 2019, https://www.fixdapp.com/blog/how-much-does-an-oxygen-sensor-cost-to-replace.

Bridwell Automotive Offers Oxygen Sensor Replacement In Scottsdale, Arizona 

Our dedicated team of ASE Master Technicians will replace your oxygen sensor (O2 sensor) in your vehicle quickly and within your budget.  You can schedule your oxygen sensor replacement with Bridwell Automotive Center by using our contact form. Stop by our Automotive Repair Shop in Scottsdale located at 7171 E Lincoln Dr. Scottsdale, Arizona 85253 or by giving Bridwell Automotive Center a call today at (480) 948-4781.

How Much Does Catalytic Converter Replacement Cost?

How Much Does A Catalytic Converter Replacement Cost?

The average cost of catalytic converter replacement is $2,181. Average prices range from $945 to $3,416 in the US for 2019 according to multiple sources. Specialty or custom cars could cost more.

Average Catalytic Converter Replacement by Source

According to Repairpal.com the average cost for a catalytic converter replacement is between $3,341 and $3,416.

Carbrain.com reports that the average cost to replace a bad catalytic converter ranges from $945 to $2,475.

High catalytic converter prices are just the beginning though. Besides the repair itself, you have to take into consideration diagnostic costs and potential issues that arise because of the converter’s failure. For example, you might need to change one or more oxygen sensors, the muffler, or the exhaust at the same time. Before you start the repair, you’ll want a complete cost breakdown. To fix it could be worth more than the car itself.

How Much Does A Catalytic Converter Cost?

For cars made after 1981, the three-way catalytic converter is going to be a lot more expensive to replace than an older one. The costs for parts are going to be around $350-$1500, while parts and labor will be between $615-$2,200. Because the costs differ so much, you may want make sure you ask for a quote before you allow a professional mechanic to replace your catalytic converter.

How Much Does Catalytic Converter Replacement Cost?

The average cost for a Catalytic Converter Replacement is between $3,341 and $3,416 but can vary from car to car. Here are a couple of examples:

  • Honda Accord – $1,485 – $1,512
  • Toyota Camry – $1,304 – $1,333
  • Chevrolet Silverado 1500 – $1,439 – $1,477
  • Honda Civic – $1,210 – $1,239
  • Toyota Corolla – $1,038 – $1,064
  • Nissan Altima – $2,127 – $2,169
  • Ford Explorer – $1,700 – $1,744
  • Honda CR-V – $1,444 – $1,469

Catalytic Converter Labor Costs

You can expect the labor cost for replacing a catalytic converter to be anywhere from $70 an hour to $130 an hour. The converter system is exposed to the elements, and may have studs that have become rusted, or bolts that hold it to the car’s engine. If the mechanic working on replacing your catalytic converter runs into any problems, they could take a while to work through them and finish the job.

How Is A Catalytic Converter Replaced?

A lot of catalytic converters are bolted in place in the exhaust system, although some are welded or clamped down. Whatever the case, the converter has to be loosened and then removed.

Several catalytic converters are built directly into the exhaust manifold, because they work more efficiently when they are hot. Not at any time touch a catalytic converter when the engine is running or any time shortly after it’s been shut off.

Signs Your Catalytic Converter Need Replacement

  • Your Check Engine light is illuminated.
  • Your vehicle refuses to turnover.
  • Your vehicle’s fuel efficiency suddenly drops.
  • You find that your vehicle doesn’t accelerate when you step on the gas pedal.
  • Your vehicle fails the state emissions test.

OBD Codes Related To Catalytic Converter Replacement

  • P0420: Catalyst System Efficiency Below Threshold
  • P0430: Catalyst System Efficiency Below Threshold
  • P200E: Catalyst System Over Temperature

Bridwell Automotive Offers Catalytic Converter Replacement In Scottsdale, Arizona 

Our dedicated team of ASE Master Technicians will help you by replacing your catalytic converter quickly and within your budget.  You can schedule your catalytic converter replacement with Bridwell Automotive Center by using our contact form. Stop by our Catalytic Converter Repair Shop in Scottsdale located at 7171 E Lincoln Dr. Scottsdale, Arizona 85253 or by giving Bridwell Automotive Center a call today (480) 948-4781.

How Much Does A Mass Airflow Sensor Replacement Cost?

How Much Does A Mass Airflow Sensor Replacement Cost?

The average cost for a mass airflow sensor replacement is $328. Prices range from $269 to $387 for a mass airflow sensor replacement for the US in 2019 according to RepairPal.

What is a mass airflow sensor?

A mass airflow (MAF) sensor continually measures the volume of air going into an engine and sends that information to the vehicle’s computer.

How does the mass airflow sensor work?

The engine’s computer receives input from a lot of sensors and ensures they all agree with each other. An extremely important sensor that is used in reference to almost all engine operations is the mass airflow (MAF) sensor. The MAF sensor records how much air is entering the engine’s intake tube and reports the information it gathers to the computer. This allows the computer to calculate, or confirm, the amount of air entering the engine, amount of exhaust gas expected, how much fuel to send into the engine and a lot of other important factors. In addition, this sensor works closely with the manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor to allow significantly accurate response to ever changing conditions.

What are the symptoms associated with a bad mass airflow sensor?

If the MAF sensor sends an inaccurate signal, a couple of things happen. The engine’s computer will activate the check engine light, and the on-board diagnostic (OBD) trouble codes will reflect the airflow deviation noted by the MAF sensor. Depending on the reported volume of air, the engine may try to compensate for these conditions, making the engine burn excessive amounts of fuel and discharges black smoke from the exhaust. In this situation, the OBD trouble codes would also reference faults identified by the exhaust oxygen sensors. The engine can also have issues with idling roughly, not starting, hesitation, stalling, loss of power, misfires and fuel intake.

Can I drive with a mass airflow sensor problem?

When the MAF sensor fails driving can be hazardous. Because engine power will surge on and off, the vehicle may careen forward. Overall engine performance may start to be unpredictable and hard to control. It is preferable to tow the vehicle if any of the mentioned indicators are present. If the vehicle operates s, or near normally, driving the vehicle should not cause any issues.

How often do mass airflow sensors need to be replaced?

MAF sensors do tend to fail sometimes in a lot of vehicles. Failure rates are usually highest between 100,000 and 125,000 miles. The sensor can also get damaged during air filter changes, or anytime the engine intake gets serviced. Furthermore, a collision can cause a physical or electrical fault in the sensor.

How are mass airflow sensor problems diagnosed?

When the check engine light is on, and OBD trouble codes are referring to the MAF sensor, the servicing tech will begin by checking the vehicle for any signs of physical damage before starting to test. A scanner will be connected to the vehicle, and current conditions will be compared to the current readings from the vehicle’s different sensors. After these conditions are analyzed and compared, the tech relies on their training to understand which component needs to be tested. Once one or more components are showing evidence of possible failure, the servicing tech will begin testing with the most likely component, until the issue has been confirmed.

How is a mass airflow sensor replaced?

Replacing the MAF sensor is typically fast and easy. The sensor will usually be on or adjacent to the intake air tube, and the fastener can be a screw or a clip. After the sensor is replaced, the tech will examine sensor data, and confirm that the issue has been fixed.

OBD codes related to Mass Airflow Sensor Replacement

·         P0100: Mass or Volume Air Flow “A” Circuit

·         P0103: Mass or Volume Air Flow “A” Circuit High

·         P0104: Mass or Volume Air Flow “A” Circuit Intermittent

What to look for when dealing with mass airflow sensor issues

There is a genuine misconception that when an OBD trouble code is read, the component listed in the code should just be replaced. This isn’t always the case and can lead to costly and unnecessary repairs. The codes in fact refer to engine conditions being indicated by sensors. Most generic code readers are limited by their programming and are usually not advanced enough to test vehicle specific systems. A “MAF Sensor” title in a code doesn’t mean the sensor has failed, but rather gives the tech a code on where to begin their testing.

Can I replace the mass airflow sensor myself?

Just about anyone can replace a mass airflow sensor. They are usually removed with a clamp, or a screw, and have 1 electrical connector that sometimes can be a little tricky on some vehicles. Protecting the sensor while working is all there is to it, and some vehicles will reset associated codes when driving.

Bridwell Automotive Offers Mass Airflow Sensor Replacement In Scottsdale, Arizona 

Our dedicated team of ASE Master Technicians will help you by replacing your mass airflow sensor quickly and within your budget.  You can schedule your mass airflow sensor repair with Bridwell Automotive Center in Scottsdale by using our contact form. Stop by our Emission Repair Shop In Scottsdale located at 7171 E Lincoln Dr. Scottsdale, Arizona 85253 or by giving Bridwell Automotive Center a call today (480) 948-4781.

How To Pass Emissions An Test

How To Pass An Emissions Test

To pass an emissions test the check engine light needs to be off, oil changed, good gas cap, use a fuel additive, and warm it up on highway.


If you’re searching for how to pass an emissions test in Scottsdale, Bridwell Automotive Center can help!

Our team understands the state and city’s requirements for emissions and how to help ensure your car, truck, or suv will pass emissions testing.ASE Certified automotive repair technicians can help you prepare for testing or can help repair issues if you have failed and emissions test.

Read more about reasons vehicles fail emissions tests and how much emissions repairs cost.


View Our Special Offers

How To Pass Emissions An Test

To give your vehicle the best chance at passing the emissions test follow these tips.  By doing a little preparation you can save yourself the headache of getting your vehicle retested.  If you’ve got more serious problems with your vehicle you will likely need to have professional automotive repair to get your vehicle to pass emissions.

Change Engine Oil

Old dirty oil in your engine can release extra pollutants which can cause you to fail your emissions test.  It’s a good practice to have your oil changed before an emissions test.

Check Gas Cap Seal

One of the most common reasons people fail an emissions test is the gas cap.  Gas cap seals are exposed to heat, cold, rain, snow and the seals break down.  If air is passing by your gas cap it can cause your vehicle to throw a check engine light and fail your vehicle in an emissions test.

Have A Tune Up

Having your vehicle tuned up about 2 weeks before you need to get the test is a great precaution also.  Your vehicle benefits from regular maintenance and it will increase the chances of passing you emissions test.  Filters will be changed and your vehicle will be running at peak performance.

Check Tire Pressures

In some states your vehicle will be ran on rollers to test emissions as if  you were moving.  This is called a dynomometer.  If your tires have low pressure it could cause your motor to release higher levels of pollutants at speed.

Add A Fuel Additive

Fuel additives help clean carbons deposits out of your vehicle’s exhaust and intake system. If you’ve got extra carbon deposits around fuel injectors, cylinders, or in the exhaust it can cause your vehicle to fail an emissions test.

Use The Vehicle

If it is a vehicle you don’t normally drive, but want to get the registration done, you will need to make sure you drive it regularly for 2 weeks leading up to your testing.  This helps clear out the exhaust system and catalytic converter from carbon and other harmful pollutants.

Drive On Highway 20 Min Before Testing

On the day of testing you’ll need to drive the vehicle on the highway for about 20 min to warm up the motor.  This makes it so when you arrive at the emissions testing center you’ll be ready to pass with flying colors.

Reasons To Fail Emissions Test

There are 6 main reasons vehicles fail emissions testing.  A check engine light is a red flag that will cause you to fail along with bad O2sensors, too rich fuel to air mixture, bad EVAP systems, leaky, or incorrect fuel metering.

Check Engine Light

The check engine light in your vehicle comes on for numerous reasons.  If it is on you should stop by our shop and let us read the code to figure out what is happening with your vehicle.  Sometimes it can be as simple as needing a new gas cap to something more serious that if ignored can result in costly repairs.

Bad 02 Sensors

Vehicles today rely on O2 sensors to monitor exhaust fumes.  When they are not working properly the vehicle will likely have a rough idle or decrease in engine power.  You will also lose mountains of MPG efficiency if your O2sensors are not working properly.  If your vehicle is burning too much fuel it will not pass emissions testing as the toxicity of the exhaust will be too high.

Rich Fuel to Air Mixture

When gasoline is injected into your engine it is mixed with a proportion of air.  This is called the “air to fuel mixture”.  How much fuel is used to in each cycle of the pistons affects your fuel mileage, power, an carbon monoxide content in your exhaust.  If you are burning too much fuel you will not pass emissions tests.

Bad EVAP System

Your Evaporative Emissions Control System, or EVAP, stops gas fumes from being released into the atmosphere by your vehicle.  When vacuum hoses are cracked, loose, or broken it will cause the check engine light to come on.  Even a loose or broken gas cap will cause the EVAP system to throw a check engine light and prevent you from passing your emissions test.

Leaky Exhaust

Exhaust leaks will wreak havoc on a vehicle’s ability to pass an emissions test.  If your exhaust system is leaking it will make the O2 sensor read incorrectly.  If the exhaust from your engine isn’t being passed through the catalytic converter it is being released into the atmosphere in categorically illegal levels.  If your exhaust system is leaking, we can repair it so you will pass the emissions test in Arizona.

Incorrect Fuel Metering

How much fuel your vehicle uses is also part of emissions testing.  If your vehicle uses too much fuel compared to it’s make and model you will likely not pass your emissions test.  The right amount of fuel is sent to the engine to make it run smoothly.  If a fuel injector or engine control unit is malfunctioning it will use too much fuel and make it hard to pass an emissions test.

How Much Does Emissions Repair Cost?

The cost to repair your vehicle so it will past emissions testing will depend on what is preventing it from passing.  If it is simply a gas cap, it will cost around $30. In contrasts it costs about $200 dollars to fix an O2 sensor in most of today’s vehicles.  If the catalytic converter needs to be replaced it will cost over $1,000 dollars.  You will save money the sooner you bring your vehicle in when the check engine light turns on.  Small issues like O2 sensors can lead to the bigger more expensive problems such as replacing your catalytic converter.

Scottsdale Emissions Repair Service

If you want to ensure you will pass on the first try for emissions testing, or if you have already failed and need help repairing your vehicle so it will pass; Bridwell Automotive Center is here to help!  From your daily driver Fords and Chevy’s all the way up to your McLaren or Ferrari our ASE Master Technicians are ready and waiting to help your pass emissions test in Scottsdale, AZ.

Schedule emissions repair or give us a call at (480) 948-4781